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Year : 2022  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 113  |  Page : 33--39

Relationships between long-term residential exposure to total environmental noise and stroke incidence


1 School of Public Health, Centre of Public Health Research, University of Montreal and CIUSSS du Centre-Sud-de-l’Île-de-Montréal, Montreal, Canada
2 Quebec National Institute of Public Health, Quebec, Canada
3 Montreal Regional Department of Public Health, Montreal, Canada
4 Quebec National Institute of Public Health, Quebec, Canada; Faculty of Pharmacy, Laval University, Quebec, Canada
5 School of Public Health, Centre of Public Health Research, University of Montreal and CIUSSS du Centre-Sud-de-l’Île-de-Montréal, Montreal, Canada; Quebec National Institute of Public Health, Quebec, Canada
6 Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland; University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
7 Department of Civil Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
8 School of Public Health, Centre of Public Health Research, University of Montreal and CIUSSS du Centre-Sud-de-l’Île-de-Montréal, Montreal; Quebec National Institute of Public Health, Quebec, Canada

Correspondence Address:
Audrey Smargiassi
School of Public Health, Centre of Public Health Research, University of Montreal and CIUSSS du Centre-Sud-de-l’Île-de-Montréal, Montreal, QC H2L 2W5
Canada
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/nah.nah_34_21

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Background: Noise has been related to several cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) such as coronary heart disease and to their risk factors such as hypertension, but associations with stroke remain under-researched, even if CVD likely share similar pathophysiologic mechanisms. Aim: The objective of the study was to examine the association between long-term residential exposure to total environmental noise and stroke incidence in Montreal, Canada. Materials and Methods: We created an open cohort of adults aged ≥45years, free of stroke before entering the cohort for the years 2000 to 2014 with health administrative data. Residential total environmental noise levels were estimated with land use regression (LUR) models. Incident stroke was based on hospital admissions. Cox hazard models with age as the time axis and time-varying exposures were used to estimate associations, which were adjusted for material deprivation, year, nitrogen dioxide, stratified for sex, and indirectly adjusted for smoking. Results: There were 9,072,492 person-years of follow-up with 47% men; 26,741 developed stroke (21,402 ischemic; 4947 hemorrhagic; 392 had both). LUR total noise level acoustic equivalent for 24 hours (LAeq24h) ranged 44 to 79 dBA. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for stroke (all types), for a 10-dBA increase in LAeq24h, was 1.06 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03–1.09]. The LAeq24h was associated with ischemic (HR per 10 dBA: 1.08; 95% CI: 1.04–1.12) but not hemorrhagic stroke (HR per 10 dBA: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.90–1.04). Conclusion: The results suggest that total environmental noise is associated with incident stroke, which is consistent with studies on transportation noise and other CVD.






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